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singersp
06-04-2006, 02:08 PM
Posted on Sun, Jun. 04, 2006

Growing up Greenway

Vikings linebacker Chad Greenway has been in some big spotlights as a star on a major college football team and a first-round draft pick, but he has remained a small-town kind of guy who takes pride in being from Mt. Vernon, S.D., population 477.

BY DON SEEHOLZER
Pioneer Press

MT. VERNON, S.D.

By car or truck, the entire tour doesn't take more than a few minutes.

Left at one street past the old practice field and track. Up another to see the town's two gas stations. Then back down Main Street, past a three-block huddle of buildings that includes a post office, bank and downtown's premier dining establishment, Wermer's Lounge and Steakhouse.

No, there isn't a lot to do in Chad Greenway's hometown, but that's OK. Little Mt. Vernon — population 477 — suits the Vikings' No. 1 draft choice just fine.

"That's very accurate," said Lee Bollock, the former University of Iowa linebacker's best friend and best man for his July 15 wedding. "We're all small-town people, and we always will be, no matter how big the city is that we live in."

No one understands that better than Bollock, who has known Greenway since they were 5 years old and attended kindergarten with him.

Bollock lives in Omaha, Neb., now, and Greenway and his fiancée recently found a house in Eden Prairie, but the two boyhood friends still have a lot of Mt. Vernon in them.

"You've got to understand," Greenway said. "I guess if you grow up in a big city, to think about living in the country seems crazy. It's the same for us."

"We're our own little community here, and for somebody to leave and go seven hours away is like crazy. People just don't do that. Guys my dad went to high school with, I went to school with their kids."

In case it isn't obvious, Greenway, one of 29 seniors in his high school graduating class, is enormously proud of his little hometown. And the feelings are mutual.

On draft day, most of the town assembled at the high school gym to help celebrate his selection by the Vikings with the 17th pick.

On this particular Saturday, a few of the locals have gathered to play cards in the back room of the gas station/convenience store managed by Greenway's older sister Jenni.

Joe Hull, who has lived all of his 66 years in Mt. Vernon, can't say enough good things about the town's favorite son.

"We take a lot of pride in him," Hull said. "We're proud of our little town, and the whole town is proud of him."

Not that anyone in this tiny farming hamlet is anything close to star-struck. Greenway might be the biggest thing ever to come out of Mt. Vernon — sports figure or otherwise — but around here, he's still just one of the guys.

"When he comes home, people are glad to see him, but they hardly even notice," his mother, Julie Greenway, said. "He's not any different than they are. He's just Chad when he's home."

No one needs to remind Greenway of that. No. 1 draft choice or not, the people who know him best say success definitely hasn't gone to his head.

"He's still down to earth," Bollock said. "He's still the same person he was in high school and I grew up with. That's what I like about him."

FIELD OF DREAMS

Understand this: Chad Greenway is no hick.

On the contrary, he's a media-savvy guy and aspiring broadcaster who will graduate from Iowa this summer with a degree in communication studies.

Likewise, Mt. Vernon is more than just a one-stoplight town full of pig farmers, but tending the hogs was one of many chores Greenway was responsible for while growing up in the little red farmhouse off one of the area's signature dirt and gravel roads.

His mother, asked at what age young Chad started helping with the farm work, thought a second and guessed, "Two? We would all help out."

That included Greenway's two older sisters, Jenni and Kelly, and parents, who have never known any other town or way of life.

"We both grew up here," Alan Greenway, Chad's father, said. "Both of us are from Mt. Vernon, and both of our dads are from Mt. Vernon."

Cows and calves graze in a field behind the house, and the hogs are kept in a large building on the same lot. A little way down the road is another rented field where the Greenways raise corn, soybeans and other crops.

"We farm about 1,000 acres, and we have another 800 acres or so of pasture," Alan Greenway said. "We sell about 4,000 head of hogs a year and 150 cows. We have a cow-calf operation. We don't fatten cattle, but we calve them out."

In addition to the farm work, Greenway's father delivers mail over a 110-mile route, so it's not hard to see where Chad got his work ethic.

"Summers are when you have to do the most work," Greenway said. "You'd wake up, and usually there was a list of stuff to do or there was field work to be done. Fix fence. The kids had their own barns to clean. They had like 12 sows in there, baby pigs. Somewhere along the line that had to get done. If somebody had a ballgame that night, somebody else had to pick up the slack."

Summer workdays could last from 5 in the morning until 10 at night and involve everything from mending fences to helping cows calve. The worst job, according to Greenway, was holding the pigs for neutering or "snipping."

"I was younger then," he said. "The pigs aren't really that heavy, but I thought they were at that point. You've got to hold them right here (around shoulder height) until mom gets done. That was one of the more difficult jobs."

For the most part, Greenway was an uncomplaining worker, according to his mother, but there were days and times when his mind would wander. Like kids everywhere, he grew up dreaming of playing in the NFL, NBA or some other professional sports league.

"I was always doing something with a ball," he said. "I had the hoop up in the drive. I thought I was going to be a T-Wolf, but then I wasn't 6-7. It kind of just worked out where I was playing all these sports, and eventually it settled that football was the one where I was going to have a chance to excel."

Greenway's father recalled that Chad rarely could sit still long enough to watch an entire NFL game, usually heading outside at halftime to shoot hoops or something.

"He was always athletic," his mother added. "When he was 5, he was athletic. I remember in kindergarten, the teacher telling me, 'That kid is fast.' "

According to his father, though, there is more to Greenway's success than just athletic ability.

"I think the biggest thing with Chad and all of our kids is the competitiveness," he said. "They don't like to lose, and that's the way it is. That's the way Chad is. He cannot stand to lose. Once in a while, I would beat him out here in H-O-R-S-E or something, and I guarantee we were going to play again until he won."

GLORY DAYS

Myron Steffen said he first became aware of Chad Greenway when he coached the future first-round NFL draft choice in seventh-grade track, but it's not like he or anyone else would have predicted his success at the time.

"A lot of people have asked me that question," Steffen said. "I don't think anybody leaves a small town like Mt. Vernon and you say they're going to be in the NFL someday. He was a good athlete, but I don't think realistically you could have said he was going to be in the NFL."

What was apparent to Steffen and everyone else was that Greenway was an uncommon athlete.

He proved that by lettering in basketball, baseball and track in addition to football at Mt. Vernon High, winning four events in the 2000 state track meet, including the triple jump and 110-meter hurdles.

"He was always the biggest, strongest and fastest," said Bollock, who played cornerback on the school's nine-man football team. "He pretty much excelled in everything we ended up playing in. He was always at the top all through grade school and high school."

It was in football, though, that Greenway really shined, playing quarterback and free safety, returning punts and kickoffs, and leading the Knights to consecutive state titles as a junior and a senior.

Not bad for a school so small it had to combine with nearby Stickney just to field a nine-man team.

"I remember one game; I think it was his junior year," said Steffen, Mt. Vernon's football coach for the past 23 years. "The other team wouldn't punt to him. They'd always punt away from him or punt it deep out of bounds. He was talking to their coach, 'Come on, coach, punt it to me. Punt it to me.' The other coach got so mad, he finally told his punter to go ahead and punt it to him, and Chad ran it back for a touchdown."

Greenway did that kind of thing often enough to become a three-time all-state selection in South Dakota, earning first-team accolades his final two seasons.

As a senior, he passed for 1,147 yards and rushed for 1,320, while adding 132 tackles and four interceptions on defense, and Greenway said he never doubted he had the ability to make it to the NFL, even though Iowa was the only Division I-A school to offer a scholarship.

He also has never forgotten how then-South Dakota coach John Austin tried to talk him out of taking his official visit to Iowa City.

"He told me straight out I wasn't good enough to play there," Greenway said. "He wanted me to go to his school. That more than anything put me over the top that I'm going to show these guys."

MARRYING MAN

Greenway impressed more than "these guys" at Iowa, where he was a three-year starter and two-time All-American whose 416 career tackles rank fifth in school history.

He also met his future bride, Jenny Capista, whom he plans to marry next month in her hometown of Shorewood, Ill., a little more than 40 miles southwest of Chicago.

"Freshman year in college we met," Greenway said. "She ran track and cross country, and they had an athlete study day. Obviously, I caught her eye."

Capista rolls her eyes at that comment, but with the wedding preparations in their final stages (they're planning a second reception in Mt. Vernon for those who can't attend), it's hard to argue.

"One of my friends knew him, that he had met at orientation that summer before school started," she said. "Then I lived down the hall from him, and some of the track girls hung out with him. You can't help but hang out with all the athletes."

When it came time to propose, Greenway said he did it the old-fashioned way, taking Capista to the Adler Planetarium overlooking downtown Chicago last July 23 and dropping to one knee.

That's right, downtown Chicago.

Greenway's fiancée has helped further his big-city education. He and his family introduced her early on to farm life, even putting her to work calling hogs and mowing the lawn.

"I was expecting them to roll out a push mower," she said. "I had never been on a riding mower before."

The results weren't pretty, but Capista and Greenway are happy that he was drafted by a Midwest team such as the Vikings instead of a big-city club from New York or Miami.

So were his parents, who didn't miss any of Greenway's games, home or away, during his final two seasons at Iowa and plan to attend every Vikings home game, at least, this fall.

"I was real happy," Julie Greenway said. "If he had been in New York or San Francisco, any time you went to see him, it was going to be 10 times harder. I've been to Florida four times with him for bowl games, and I prefer this part of the country."

That runs in the family, and Greenway still is a small-town kid at heart, but as far as NFL cities go, the Vikings and Eden Prairie represent the best possible fit.

"I wouldn't want to live in downtown Minneapolis," he said, "but I can handle the suburbs."

Don Seeholzer can be reached at dseeholzer@pioneerpress.com.

Growing up Greenway (http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/sports/football/nfl/minnesota_vikings/14730319.htm)

COJOMAY
06-04-2006, 02:20 PM
I've spent my entire life living on farms or small rural towns and the press just don't get it. They just can't imagine living anywhere else but a big city and so they write articles like this all the time. Nothing against Greenway, but they all are written in the same vain -- small town, one grocery store, working farm family, work ethic. I think they teach this coure in journalism class call "Small Town Hick Writing 101."

Vikes_King
06-04-2006, 03:32 PM
lol, yeah i know, it all sounds so familiar doesnt it?

NordicNed
06-04-2006, 04:13 PM
"COJOMAY" wrote:

I've spent my entire life living on farms or small rural towns and the press just don't get it. They just can't imagine living anywhere else but a big city and so they write articles like this all the time. Nothing against Greenway, but they all are written in the same vain -- small town, one grocery store, working farm family, work ethic. I think they teach this coure in journalism class call "Small Town Hick Writing 101."

Sounds like heaven to me..... :grin:


All I have is 7-elevens on every corner and the opisite corner as a liquer store. You see more Puerto Rico and Mexican Flags flying than you do American. Instead of falling to sleep with criketes, we fall alseep to pounding beats of rap, shaking the windows and gun shots ringing thruout the night. Usually the last person I say good night to lately is a Police Officer..
The air is brown and the only reason we have floods is because the catch basins on the roads are full of trash and dead cats and dogs...

But not for much longer, Thank God, my wife and I are looking at homes right now. We are buying a house in the next month or so, just looking for the right one right now...

twill
06-04-2006, 04:17 PM
good luck to greenway on his marriage... wish him the best!

singersp
06-04-2006, 06:35 PM
Personally, I prefer to be "out in the sticks" & away from even rural towns.

They couldn't pay me enough money to live in a city like Minneapolis.

VikesfaninWis
06-04-2006, 06:54 PM
Great read, thanks Singers... Chad Greenway seems like a real down to earth type of guy.. That is exactly what we need on the Vikes.. Can't wait to see this guy in action.. The start of the season can't come soon enough.

VikesfaninWis
06-04-2006, 06:58 PM
"VikingNed" wrote:

"COJOMAY" wrote:

I've spent my entire life living on farms or small rural towns and the press just don't get it. They just can't imagine living anywhere else but a big city and so they write articles like this all the time. Nothing against Greenway, but they all are written in the same vain -- small town, one grocery store, working farm family, work ethic. I think they teach this coure in journalism class call "Small Town Hick Writing 101."

Sounds like heaven to me..... :grin:


All I have is 7-elevens on every corner and the opisite corner as a liquer store. You see more Puerto Rico and Mexican Flags flying than you do American. Instead of falling to sleep with criketes, we fall alseep to pounding beats of rap, shaking the windows and gun shots ringing thruout the night. Usually the last person I say good night to lately is a Police Officer..
The air is brown and the only reason we have floods is because the catch basins on the roads are full of trash and dead cats and dogs...

But not for much longer, Thank God, my wife and I are looking at homes right now. We are buying a house in the next month or so, just looking for the right one right now...


Good luck with that Ned.. I know what you mean though.. I grew up in West Palm Beach Florida.. My brother was in a gang, and we had other gang members trying to get into our house looking for my brother.. Good thing we had a huge German Shepard to guard the house. I was in baseball, and it seemed like every game that I went to, we heard gun shots.. I live in a small city in Wisconsin now, and honestly wouldn't trade it for anything..

DarrinNelsonguy
06-04-2006, 07:05 PM
I don't know about you guys but I am so sick of reading about Greenway's small town and his childhood. Come on people he grew up in small town America end of story. ENOUGH ALREADY!

singersp
06-04-2006, 07:09 PM
"VikingNed" wrote:

All I have is 7-elevens on every corner and the opisite corner as a liquer store. You see more Puerto Rico and Mexican Flags flying than you do American. Instead of falling to sleep with criketes, we fall alseep to pounding beats of rap, shaking the windows and gun shots ringing thruout the night. Usually the last person I say good night to lately is a Police Officer..
The air is brown and the only reason we have floods is because the catch basins on the roads are full of trash and dead cats and dogs...

But not for much longer, Thank God, my wife and I are looking at homes right now. We are buying a house in the next month or so, just looking for the right one right now...

The only gunshots I hear are either from the duck hunters on the Mississippi or the deer/small game hunters in the nearby woods.

And Ned, within 100 yards from my house you can hear the sunnies "popping" & the fish jumping in the Mississippi backwaters.

singersp
06-04-2006, 09:25 PM
"VikingNed" wrote:

All I have is 7-elevens on every corner and the opisite corner as a liquer store. You see more Puerto Rico and Mexican Flags flying than you do American. Instead of falling to sleep with criketes, we fall alseep to pounding beats of rap, shaking the windows and gun shots ringing thruout the night. Usually the last person I say good night to lately is a Police Officer..
The air is brown and the only reason we have floods is because the catch basins on the roads are full of trash and dead cats and dogs...


:salute: Thanx Ned, you really have me "pumped" & excited to come out & visit you this summer.

I can't wait! :roll: :lol:

Vikes_King
06-04-2006, 09:27 PM
lol, sounds like an amazing place to live

PurplePeopleEaters89
06-05-2006, 01:23 AM
I like that he isn't full of himself!! A lot of guys who get drafted in the 1st round think they are too good!! But he seems like a down-to-earth kinda guy!!!

BadlandsVikings
06-05-2006, 02:20 AM
A lot of people who come from a small place aren't white trash or hicks. They might be little bit saner than people who come the middle of a big city. I come from western North Dakota where you can see a dog run away for 2 days. You might have a neighbor but you can't see them. Now I live in the back woods of Hillbilly land, I love it because I can see my neigbor but they are so far away I don't have to hear them. I would go nuts if I had to live in the city. I love the sound of the running river in front of my house and the crickets and frogs at night. God bless the middle of nowhere, it doesn't mean your stupid.

twill
06-05-2006, 02:24 AM
"westvirginiavikings" wrote:

A lot of people who come from a small place aren't white trash or hicks. They might be little bit saner than people who come the middle of a big city. I come from western North Dakota where you can see a dog run away for 2 days. You might have a neighbor but you can't see them. Now I live in the back woods of Hillbilly land, I love it because I can see my neigbor but they are so far away I don't have to hear them. I would go nuts if I had to live in the city. I love the sound of the running river in front of my house and the crickets and frogs at night. God bless the middle of nowhere, it doesn't mean your stupid.

i guess it depends on how your raised.. i wouldnt mind having a vacation home where u live, but im a type of guy that i need to be in a place thats multi-ethnic... i cant be in a place where i dont have my latinos, afro-americans, euros, etc.

bs4nu
06-05-2006, 03:33 AM
If you're ever out that way in SoDak Wermers lounge in Mt Vernon makes a ribeye that looks more like a small roast. Its right along I90 11 miles west of Mitchell

NordicNed
06-05-2006, 03:43 AM
"singersp" wrote:

"VikingNed" wrote:

All I have is 7-elevens on every corner and the opisite corner as a liquer store. You see more Puerto Rico and Mexican Flags flying than you do American. Instead of falling to sleep with criketes, we fall alseep to pounding beats of rap, shaking the windows and gun shots ringing thruout the night. Usually the last person I say good night to lately is a Police Officer..
The air is brown and the only reason we have floods is because the catch basins on the roads are full of trash and dead cats and dogs...


:salute: Thanx Ned, you really have me "pumped" & excited to come out & visit you this summer.

I can't wait! :roll: :lol:

No need to worry Singer, I'de be taking you to some of the finer areas of CT and Possibly RI.....Even if we where in the city for some of the times, your in good hands for sure. I was born and raised in big city areas, so I'm a bit street wise and most around here know me, so they don't screw with me at all......

You'll still have a blast out here when visiting me.....

Warp
06-05-2006, 04:04 AM
I dont know, i live in the middle of nowhere,(northern minnesota) and it has advantages but then again it can get very boring. Of course i am 19 years old so anything can be boring :lol: . I also hate the long drives to get to anywhere, especially with the gas prices. But all in all its better than living in the city :grin: .

Ltrey33
06-05-2006, 04:57 AM
"COJOMAY" wrote:

I've spent my entire life living on farms or small rural towns and the press just don't get it. They just can't imagine living anywhere else but a big city and so they write articles like this all the time. Nothing against Greenway, but they all are written in the same vain -- small town, one grocery store, working farm family, work ethic. I think they teach this coure in journalism class call "Small Town Hick Writing 101."

:lol:

You're right Cojo...these stories are really a dime a dozen. They do get pretty annoying, but it is nice to see that he hasn't forgotten where he came from. It would be really easy for him to move away from all of that and become this fancy pants millionaire.