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singersp
06-02-2006, 08:39 AM
Wilfs are running first-class operation

Renovations at Winter Park are just one sign the Vikings owners are committed to fielding a championship team no matter the cost.

Sid Hartman, Star Tribune
Last update: June 01, 2006 – 11:35 PM

Even though the Wilf family, which owns the Vikings, expects to be involved in a new football stadium in the next few years, it has spent a lot of money remodeling Winter Park to make it a first-class facility.

Unlike the former ownership under Red McCombs, which wouldn't spent a quarter even to fix a leaking roof, the Wilfs have spent maybe $3 million on Winter Park improvements. They are building a brand-new equipment room, a locker room that will be as up-to-date as any in the game and a great players lounge. Everything is being done first-class for the players and free agents who visit the facility.

The team has built an office for coach Brad Childress, plus a board room that includes technology that would make any big corporation proud.

Profit is not the No. 1 goal of this ownership. If revenue sharing doesn't work out, the Wilfs will lose money because the club's total revenue will be among the bottom three in the NFL.

The most important thing the Wilf family wants is a Super Bowl championship.

And there is no doubt the Wilfs hired the right coach in Childress, who is as organized as any head coach I have watched operate.

If the Vikings don't have a winning team, it won't because of a lack of hard work by Childress and his coaching staff. If you visit Winter Park these days, you would think the season already has started.

The Vikings have some 45 players working out in development camp, and if you talk to the players, this coaching staff has impressed them.

Childress won't be friendly with the media like his predecessor, Mike Tice, was.

But he will operate just like Bill Parcells of the Cowboys, Bill Belichick of the Patriots and other old-time coaches who don't buddy up to the media but know that all that counts is "win, baby" and everything will work out OK.

Jottings

The Vikings are $12 million under the salary cap, but Zygi Wilf said he doesn't believe a team's standing in regards to the cap dictates how good it is.

"I don't know where we sit with the cap," Wilf said. "I don't think that has ever been an influence in our decisions to select personnel who would be best for our team. When the right opportunity comes, we hope to take advantage of it, but it never dictates the way we want to put our team together."

Sid Hartman can be heard weekdays on WCCO 830-AM at 6:40, 7:40 and 8:40 a.m. He is at shartman@startribune.com.

Entire article: Wilfs are running first-class operation (http://www.startribune.com/507/story/468592.html)

bigdaddy72_1
06-02-2006, 08:52 AM
"singersp" wrote:

Profit is not the No. 1 goal of this ownership. If revenue sharing doesn't work out, the Wilfs will lose money because the club's total revenue will be among the bottom three in the NFL.

The Vikings definitely are not at the top of the list when it comes to revenue, but they are most certainly not going to be hanging out at the bottom three. The Vikings will continue to hang around the middle of the pack as far as revenue goes.

What is it with the writers at the Star Tribune. They can't give a compliment to any of the organizations in the community without somehow critizing them in the process. And this doesn't seem to start and end with the sports world. I think that these public voices should undestand that they should do their part to lift the pride of their community.

snowinapril
06-02-2006, 09:01 AM
Renovations at Winter Park are just one sign the Vikings owners are committed to fielding a championship team no matter the cost.

Even though the Wilf family, which owns the Vikings, expects to be involved in a new football stadium in the next few years, it has spent a lot of money remodeling Winter Park to make it a first-class facility.

Unlike the former ownership under Red McCombs, which wouldn't spent a quarter even to fix a leaking roof, the Wilfs have spent maybe $3 million on Winter Park improvements. They are building a brand-new equipment room, a locker room that will be as up-to-date as any in the game and a great players lounge. Everything is being done first-class for the players and free agents who visit the facility.


If you think about it, this says a lot.

They spent 3 million on a building that will probably not have a great resale value when they go. How many people want to buy a practice facility?? Just like they say when you are thinking abot getting out of a house. Don't put a lot into, you can't just add the price you paid to fix it to the house and expect to get your money back out of it.

singersp
06-02-2006, 12:21 PM
"snowinapril" wrote:



Renovations at Winter Park are just one sign the Vikings owners are committed to fielding a championship team no matter the cost.

Even though the Wilf family, which owns the Vikings, expects to be involved in a new football stadium in the next few years, it has spent a lot of money remodeling Winter Park to make it a first-class facility.

Unlike the former ownership under Red McCombs, which wouldn't spent a quarter even to fix a leaking roof, the Wilfs have spent maybe $3 million on Winter Park improvements. They are building a brand-new equipment room, a locker room that will be as up-to-date as any in the game and a great players lounge. Everything is being done first-class for the players and free agents who visit the facility.


If you think about it, this says a lot.

They spent 3 million on a building that will probably not have a great resale value when they go. How many people want to buy a practice facility?? Just like they say when you are thinking abot getting out of a house. Don't put a lot into, you can't just add the price you paid to fix it to the house and expect to get your money back out of it.

I can & did. :wink:

NordicNed
06-02-2006, 12:56 PM
"snowinapril" wrote:



Renovations at Winter Park are just one sign the Vikings owners are committed to fielding a championship team no matter the cost.

Even though the Wilf family, which owns the Vikings, expects to be involved in a new football stadium in the next few years, it has spent a lot of money remodeling Winter Park to make it a first-class facility.

Unlike the former ownership under Red McCombs, which wouldn't spent a quarter even to fix a leaking roof, the Wilfs have spent maybe $3 million on Winter Park improvements. They are building a brand-new equipment room, a locker room that will be as up-to-date as any in the game and a great players lounge. Everything is being done first-class for the players and free agents who visit the facility.


If you think about it, this says a lot.

They spent 3 million on a building that will probably not have a great resale value when they go. How many people want to buy a practice facility?? Just like they say when you are thinking abot getting out of a house. Don't put a lot into, you can't just add the price you paid to fix it to the house and expect to get your money back out of it.

That really depends on the house itself, it's fix up needs, location, and realestate market....

My first house and lot I paid 58,000 for, paint, some landscaping and some remodeling of a bathroom and kitchen, over a 2 year span...plus the market got stronger for sellers....I then sold the whole deal for $128.000 I probably only put 18,000 into the house.....

Do the math......Not a bad profit... They call it Flippin a House...

COJOMAY
06-02-2006, 02:55 PM
"bigdaddy72_1" wrote:

"singersp" wrote:

Profit is not the No. 1 goal of this ownership. If revenue sharing doesn't work out, the Wilfs will lose money because the club's total revenue will be among the bottom three in the NFL.

The Vikings definitely are not at the top of the list when it comes to revenue, but they are most certainly not going to be hanging out at the bottom three. The Vikings will continue to hang around the middle of the pack as far as revenue goes.

What is it with the writers at the Star Tribune. They can't give a compliment to any of the organizations in the community without somehow critizing them in the process. And this doesn't seem to start and end with the sports world. I think that these public voices should undestand that they should do their part to lift the pride of their community.

I don't see this as a "slam" to the team or the ownership. It's a fact. The Vikings are a small market team just like Cincinnati. And with the shortage of high priced luxury boxes in the Metrodome it will always be a near the bottom of revenue in the NFL.

I love this quote from Sid because he sees through all the BS of his media buddies:

Childress won't be friendly with the media like his predecessor, Mike Tice, was.

But he will operate just like Bill Parcells of the Cowboys, Bill Belichick of the Patriots and other old-time coaches who don't buddy up to the media but know that all that counts is "win, baby" and everything will work out OK.

Eyedea
06-02-2006, 03:58 PM
We all know first class organizations have disagreements with players then justify trades through the media, sign people with out checking thier backround, and practice sneaky, almost un-ethical, ways to sign guys...

Ltrey33
06-02-2006, 04:08 PM
"Eyedea" wrote:

We all know first class organizations have disagreements with players then justify trades through the media, sign people with out checking thier backround, and practice sneaky, almost un-ethical, ways to sign guys...

:roll: Sour grapes!

First of all, you can't say that the Daunte situation was all the organizations fault. Second of all, it's not the first time someone was fired over their resume or the first time a company failed to catch a lie on a resume. Third, the Vikings didn't do anything that was out of legal or NFL bounds. They wanted to sign a guy, so they did it.

In a few words: Don't hate the player, hate the game.

Eyedea
06-02-2006, 04:31 PM
"Ltrey33" wrote:

"Eyedea" wrote:

We all know first class organizations have disagreements with players then justify trades through the media, sign people with out checking thier backround, and practice sneaky, almost un-ethical, ways to sign guys...

:roll: Sour grapes!

First of all, you can't say that the Daunte situation was all the organizations fault. Second of all, it's not the first time someone was fired over their resume or the first time a company failed to catch a lie on a resume. Third, the Vikings didn't do anything that was out of legal or NFL bounds. They wanted to sign a guy, so they did it.

In a few words: Don't hate the player, hate the game.

it didnt break any NFL rules, but it broke one of those 'unwritten rules' between teams.

sirweeze
06-02-2006, 04:51 PM
Childress won't be friendly with the media like his predecessor, Mike Tice, was.

But he will operate just like Bill Parcells of the Cowboys, Bill Belichick of the Patriots and other old-time coaches who don't buddy up to the media but know that all that counts is "win, baby" and everything will work out OK.[/quote]

I liked that. Speaking of which, what's the over/under in timeframe for when Reusse writes another WHINY-A$$ article about how the Vikings will finish 0-16?